Anneliese Wahlman - Archives

God in the Hood by Anneliese Wahlman

God in the Hood

December 21, 2016 | Anneliese Wahlman

Have you ever had one of those Christmases where your entire pajama-clad family is gathered together, the tree is wrapped in lights that shine à la star of Bethlehem, and mugs are filled with hot chocolate and freckled with marshmallows? You know the kind of thing I’m talking about, where the snow is falling silently and you light candles with names like “Burning Christmas Tree Deluxe” to give the illusion that you live in a cabin in the woods instead of a cookie-cutter condo in suburbia? All the brown paper packages are tied up with string and lovingly laid under the tree, and your whole clan is singing carols together around the piano while you unitedly promote a wholesome sense of Pinterest-inspired Christmas joy?

Yeah, me neither.

I’m part of a generation that likes to create false realities on social media; we like to make our lives appear just as glamorous and magical as what we see on TV. And during the holidays, this lust for a movie-scripted life and …
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Anneliese Wahlman

Editorial Intern
Light Bearers

God in His Underwear by Anneliese Wahlman

God in His Underwear

November 13, 2016 | Anneliese Wahlman

When I tell people how many siblings I have, their eyes usually grow to unflattering proportions and they say something like, “Wow. That’s a lot of kids.”

You don’t say.

None of us is adopted and no, we’re not catholic. My mom just always dreamed of a having a big, beautiful (and slightly chaotic) mess of kids for her own. And seven children did that job perfectly.

One of the luxuries of having so many children is that there’s never a short of comic relief. Who needs Cheaper by the Dozen or The Brady Bunch when you have your own tribe to entertain you? For example, when one of my brothers was old enough to learn to dress himself but still young enough to need coaching, my mom began reminding him every day to put on a clean pair of underwear. She thought this plan was working well and her young man was sprouting wings of independence, till she noticed that his backside was growing and beginning to resemble a …
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Anneliese Wahlman

Editorial Intern
Light Bearers

Surprised by Gentleness by Anneliese Wahlman

Surprised by Gentleness

October 28, 2016 | Anneliese Wahlman

I find it quite paradoxical how, on a given day, I can clean my kitchen so well you’d think I was Cinderella, but then the next day it looks like the shared apartment of a couple phlegmatic bachelors. Something tells me this shouldn’t happen, but thanks to the law of entropy, it does. There are many paradoxes in life, things that seem apparently contradictory, but are actually quite true and do happen.

Children are another good example. One Christmas, my sister, brother-in-law, and their two kids came to visit. Throughout the time they were there, I was amazed that my little niece—who wasn’t much bigger than a bread basket—could cry so loud and for so long. You’d think noises like that could only come from fire engines or air raid sirens, but au contraire, mon frère. The lungs of a one-year-old are well-able to rival those of any Scottish bagpipe player.

One of the things I love about the Bible is how it, too, is chock-full of paradoxes. Its pages …
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Anneliese Wahlman

Editorial Intern
Light Bearers

Share the Wealth: A Mission Update from Madagascar by Anneliese Wahlman

Share the Wealth: A Mission Update from Madagascar

October 7, 2016 | Anneliese Wahlman

The United Nations Development Programme’s most recent data ranked Madagascar 154 out of 188 countries on the Human Development Index.1 That’s basically a sterile way of saying that, as a country, Madagascar doesn’t seem to have much going for it. Rich in biodiversity and culture, but seemingly poor in just about every other area, Madagascar is a land of extremes—extreme natural beauty juxtaposed with extreme poverty.2 In a population of nearly 23 million people, a staggering 75% live below the international poverty line.3 Children with haunting eyes and distended bellies wander the streets. Young girls hang around the local night clubs looking for a way to make some money in exchange for their innocence.4 It all seems rather bleak.

But through the horrifying misery the Malagasy people endure, they are open to the gospel. While the Western world has been anesthetized through materialism and excess, Madagascar is open to its true need—Jesus Christ.

After visiting the country, Light Bearers Publishing Correspondent Meiring Pretorius described this time of religious receptivity as …
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Anneliese Wahlman

Editorial Intern
Light Bearers

With the Flip of a Switch by Anneliese Wahlman

With the Flip of a Switch

September 8, 2016 | Anneliese Wahlman

As a kid, I suffered from the quintessential childhood fear: I was scared of the dark. I could be in a room that I knew like the back of my hand, and if the lights turned off, my fear turned on. It didn’t help that my older brother would come into my room at night and tell me—in a voice that sounded like he’d swallowed about four dirty dishrags—all about the monsters that would come to get me if I took one shuddering step out of bed. And it probably didn’t help when my older sister told me that the long, cobweb-filled crawlspace in my closet was the gateway to hell. But what are older siblings for, right?

Darkness is scary because of one self-evident fact: you can’t see. Once the lights are on, everything turns back to normal. The horror film soundtrack that was blasting in your ears just moments before turns off. You put down the baseball bat you were going to use to take out the axe …
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Anneliese Wahlman

Editorial Intern
Light Bearers

A Wall Against Sexual Assault by Anneliese Wahlman

A Wall Against Sexual Assault

July 14, 2016 | Anneliese Wahlman

If righteous indignation were a tub of gasoline, then the recent Stanford sexual assault case has been the match. There’s nothing more infuriating than seeing someone suffer unfairly and justice go unserved, and this particular story has caused over a million people to explode in anger.1

In case you haven’t heard, on January 18, 2015, Brock Turner, a former Stanford student and athlete, was found assaulting an intoxicated, unconscious woman outside of a fraternity house on campus. When two young men, both grad students, saw and approached him, Turner ran, leaving the young woman lying half naked on the ground, as though she were a piece of garbage from behind the dumpster where he assaulted her. One of the students tended to the girl while the other caught Turner, who was also intoxicated, and held him till the police arrived. On June 2, 2016, a jury found Turner guilty of three felonies: “assault with the intent to commit rape, sexual penetration with a foreign object of an intoxicated person and …
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Anneliese Wahlman

Editorial Intern
Light Bearers