Health - Archives

Salt in Circulation by Risë Rafferty

Salt in Circulation

September 27, 2017 | Risë Rafferty, RDN

From dead seas to living ones, embedded in white veins in the depths of the earth to its surface, salt is one of the world’s most precious commodities. At one time, salt was traded ounce for ounce with gold. Salt coins were used as money. Salt was even used as part of a soldier’s salary. Caravans traversed salt routes that extended from Morocco, through the Sahara Desert, to Timbuktu. Trade ships exchanged salt for spices and valuable products of the time. Salt was regarded as having the ability to repel evil and sustain life.

There are some foods that are edible and even delicious without salt, such as vine ripe tomatoes and watermelon. You may put salt on these foods, but it’s not really a necessity, right? Then there are foods that, at least to my palate, are inedible and tasteless without salt, such as potatoes, beans, tofu, and bread. If we think about it just for a second, we come to realize that while salt is no longer as …
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Risë Rafferty, RDN

Health Educator
Light Bearers

An Effort of Nature by Risë Rafferty

An Effort of Nature

August 30, 2017 | Risë Rafferty, RDN

Throughout much of the 20th century, atherosclerosis was thought of as a disease of the inside space of arteries, the lumen. Most of us considered this hardening and thickening of the arteries to be the result of excess lipids in the bloodstream. Fat build up resulted in clogged arteries and clogged arteries don’t make for free-flowing blood to the brain and heart. As a result, fat-free was the way to be. Low-fat became the health slogan emboldened on plastic packaging in an attempt to ease fat-conscious consumers seeking to avoid the #1 killer: cardiovascular disease. Unfortunately, consuming all of those low-fat, processed foods didn’t make much of a dent in our ever-escalating disease and death rate.

Yes, elevated blood lipids (fat-like compounds) contribute to heart disease in a big way.  LDL cholesterol especially is strongly associated with atherosclerosis, and reducing saturated fat in the diet does lower LDL. In fact, current knowledge is that the higher your blood cholesterol level, the greater your risk of developing heart disease or having …
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Risë Rafferty, RDN

Health Educator
Light Bearers

Interconnected by Risë Rafferty

Interconnected

June 28, 2017 | Risë Rafferty, RDN

Suffering from pain, debility, loss of quality of life, destruction and/or malfunction of bodily processes and tissue characterizes disease. Medical science has devoted itself to the study of disease and in so doing has specialized in categorizing the human body so that we can see the correct specialist for the defined problem. It seems neat and tidy that way, at least in our current medical system. Unfortunately, there is not a facet of our physiology that has escaped illness.

We tend to think that if we have pain in the knee we have a joint problem. If we have pain or malfunction of the intestines we must have a gastrointestinal problem. If my heart beats irregularly, I must have a heart problem. If we have elevated blood sugar levels we must be eating too many carbs, etc. In reality, it can be a lot more complex than that. The more I study, the more amazed I am that when God designed the human body, He was less concerned about compartmentalizing …
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Risë Rafferty, RDN

Health Educator
Light Bearers

Sweet Sleep by Risë Rafferty

Sweet Sleep

May 31, 2017 | Risë Rafferty, RDN

Time is central to planet Earth. Every facet of this globe is regulated to some degree or other with time. Creation was based on time segments. Separate and unique accomplishments were designed in each sequential day. Heavenly bodies were assigned to direct seasons and periods. Time is valued as it relates to the possibilities it contains and therefore is extremely precious. Most of us receive monetary remuneration of our work in the context of time. Our level of education is largely quantified in relation to how much time we spent in study. We typically assess projects and chores on how much time they require. Even the level of intimacy in our relationships is largely based on time spent with each other.

Rarely do we seem to have enough time. We keep track of days, hours, minutes, and even seconds to maximize time. Our attempts at accomplishing, experiencing, and enjoying everything we need or want often results in time being sacrificed from another aspect of our lives. Sleep is one of …
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Risë Rafferty, RDN

Health Educator
Light Bearers

To Strengthen Man's Heart by Risë Rafferty

To Strengthen Man’s Heart

May 3, 2017 | Risë Rafferty, RDN

Reportedly there are 195,000 species of plants which produce edible parts that could be consumed by humans. How many of those 195,000 species do we consume? Approximately 17 plant species provide 90 percent of our food supply. Grains constitute the largest percentage among that group. Wheat, maize, rice, and barley are the first four on a list of the world’s top 30 food crops. Eight grains— wheat, maize, rice, barley, sorghum, oats, rye, and millet—provide 56 percent of the food and 50 percent of the protein consumed on planet Earth.

Despite the fact that humanity relies heavily on grains as dietary staples (and has done so for millennia), there is a trending idea that grains are not good for you. Daily I am confronted with the impact of the grains-are-bad philosophy. “I love bread” is expressed as a guilty confession rather than an expression of enjoyment.

There are a variety of reasons given for the avoidance of grains in the diet. Grains are a carbohydrate and therefore seen as a …
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Risë Rafferty, RDN

Health Educator
Light Bearers

Migrating Motor Complex by Risë Rafferty

The Migrating Motor Complex

April 5, 2017 | Risë Rafferty, RDN

The term migration, in the animal kingdom, refers to a phenomenon that portrays rhythmic cadence, routine, and structure. Whether of butterfly, bird, or fish, the intent of migration is typically to ansure healthy survival in response to changing climates, shifting environments, or threats. For much of the animal kingdom, migration is instinctive and seasonal. Disruption of animals’ normal migratory patterns results in tragedy to the species. While throughout history man has voluntarily migrated in response to changing weather, environment, or threat, there is a natural instinctive migratory rhythm within the human body. This inner migratory pattern is found in the digestive tract and is called tingthe migrating motor complex (MMC).

The migrating motor complex is a cyclic pattern of movement that occurs in the stomach and small intestine, stimulated by electro-chemical cues. Four phases have been identified in the MMC. Phase I appears to be a quiet, restful stage without muscular contraction in the stomach and small intestine. Random contractions begin in phase II. Then these contractions increase to “bursts …
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Risë Rafferty, RDN

Health Educator
Light Bearers

Spinach by Risë Rafferty

Spinach

March 1, 2017 | Risë Rafferty, RDN

Spinach is an extremely nutrient-packed vegetable. Its tender leaves and mild flavor have made it a versatile food. Interestingly, the cooler the temperatures and the more stress the spinach experiences while growing, the denser the vitamins and minerals it contains. Unfortunately, even though spinach is probably one of the most commonly consumed dark green leafy vegetables, the average American (myself included) does not get anywhere near the three cups a day of green leafy vegetables that Dr. Terry Wahls consumed to address her multiple sclerosis. Her testimony is quite provocative, as she shares how, with the aid of dramatic dietary intervention, she went from being wheelchair bound to riding bikes and running. After reaping such results, Dr. Wahls is motivated to eat her greens. What would motivate you to eat more green leafy vegetables?

Cancer fighter

Rather than saying that green vegetables prevent cancer, science likes to identify individual substances that have proven efficacy in the lab. Spinach contains chlorophyll; chlorophyllin, a substance produced from chlorophyll; NOG (N-oxalylglycine); and MGDG, …
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Risë Rafferty, RDN

Health Educator
Light Bearers