Posts Tagged: cancer

Spinach by Risë Rafferty

Spinach

March 1, 2017 | Risë Rafferty, RDN

Spinach is an extremely nutrient-packed vegetable. Its tender leaves and mild flavor have made it a versatile food. Interestingly, the cooler the temperatures and the more stress the spinach experiences while growing, the denser the vitamins and minerals it contains. Unfortunately, even though spinach is probably one of the most commonly consumed dark green leafy vegetables, the average American (myself included) does not get anywhere near the three cups a day of green leafy vegetables that Dr. Terry Wahls consumed to address her multiple sclerosis. Her testimony is quite provocative, as she shares how, with the aid of dramatic dietary intervention, she went from being wheelchair bound to riding bikes and running. After reaping such results, Dr. Wahls is motivated to eat her greens. What would motivate you to eat more green leafy vegetables?

Cancer fighter

Rather than saying that green vegetables prevent cancer, science likes to identify individual substances that have proven efficacy in the lab. Spinach contains chlorophyll; chlorophyllin, a substance produced from chlorophyll; NOG (N-oxalylglycine); and MGDG, …
read more »

Risë Rafferty, RDN

Health Educator
Light Bearers

Tumeric—One Who Is Victorious Over Disease

Turmeric—One Who Is Victorious Over Disease

November 30, 2016 | Risë Rafferty, RDN

Did you know that an estimated 80% of the world’s inhabitants rely on traditional therapies that have been used for thousands of years? Anciently, turmeric was used in places like China and India to aid digestion, improve liver function, treat arthritis pain, heartburn, stomach ulcers, inflammation, and cancer. Turmeric has been applied directly to the skin as a healing salve for eczema, small pox, shingles, and wounds. But does turmeric have actual medicinal legitimacy? Does it have any proven effects on specific disease processes? From the research that I have been exposed to, I would say turmeric is living up to one of its traditional Indian nicknames: one who is victorious over disease.

Turmeric is a shrub-like tropical plant that grows about three feet tall. It bears a lovely pink-hued flower, but it is the finger-like underground stems, or rhizomes, that are so highly valued. If not used fresh, the stems are boiled, dried, and ground into a deep orange-yellow spice. Turmeric, commonly used in curries and savory dishes, is …
read more »

Risë Rafferty, RDN

Health Educator
Light Bearers

Butyrate and the Bowel, Part 3 by Rise Rafferty

Butyrate and the Bowel, pt 3

October 5, 2016 | Risë Rafferty, RDN

Crosstalk is a term that can pertain to telecommunications, when distinguishable signals leak from one connection to another. In electronics, crosstalk is a phenomenon by which a signal on one circuit or channel of a transmission system creates an effect on another circuit or channel. The term has been borrowed and used in reference to the human body when communication signals in one body system “leak out” and communicate to another seemingly unrelated body system. For example, science is suggesting that crosstalk exists between the bowel and the brain via butyrate.

We have been looking at the short-chain fatty acid butyrate the past couple months and have seen what a significant role it plays in bowel health, immune system function, obesity, and diabetes. “Indeed, it is clear that host energy metabolism and immune functions critically depend on butyrate as a potent regulator, highlighting butyrate as a key mediator of host-microbe crosstalk.”1 But even beyond this crosstalk between host and microbe, the suggestion that butyrate crosstalks with the brain has led …
read more »

Risë Rafferty, RDN

Health Educator
Light Bearers

Prostate Cancer—Caught in the Headlights by Risë Rafferty

Prostate Cancer—Caught in the Headlights

June 1, 2016 | Risë Rafferty, RDN

It’s nighttime. You are driving a country road when a deer leaps onto the pavement in front of you, stops in the middle of the road, seemingly looks straight at you and freezes. If the deer kept his eyes focused on the direction he was originally headed he would have had a good chance of bounding away to safety, but it’s as if looking into the headlights Tased him. Why does that happen?!

The eyes of the deer were designed to be able to see at night. Their pupils are elliptical and can dilate to cover the entire width of the eye to take in more light. Their lens is larger than ours, again giving it better night vision. In addition, they have a reflector behind the retina that reflects light within the eye. David C. Yancy, a deer biologist with the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resource, explains that when a deer’s eyes are fully dilated to capture as much light as possible, the intense headlight beam of …
read more »

Risë Rafferty, RDN

Health Educator
Light Bearers