Posts Tagged: diabetes

Interconnected by Risë Rafferty

Interconnected

June 28, 2017 | Risë Rafferty, RDN

Suffering from pain, debility, loss of quality of life, destruction and/or malfunction of bodily processes and tissue characterizes disease. Medical science has devoted itself to the study of disease and in so doing has specialized in categorizing the human body so that we can see the correct specialist for the defined problem. It seems neat and tidy that way, at least in our current medical system. Unfortunately, there is not a facet of our physiology that has escaped illness.

We tend to think that if we have pain in the knee we have a joint problem. If we have pain or malfunction of the intestines we must have a gastrointestinal problem. If my heart beats irregularly, I must have a heart problem. If we have elevated blood sugar levels we must be eating too many carbs, etc. In reality, it can be a lot more complex than that. The more I study, the more amazed I am that when God designed the human body, He was less concerned about compartmentalizing …
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Risë Rafferty, RDN

Health Educator
Light Bearers

Sweet Sleep by Risë Rafferty

Sweet Sleep

May 31, 2017 | Risë Rafferty, RDN

Time is central to planet Earth. Every facet of this globe is regulated to some degree or other with time. Creation was based on time segments. Separate and unique accomplishments were designed in each sequential day. Heavenly bodies were assigned to direct seasons and periods. Time is valued as it relates to the possibilities it contains and therefore is extremely precious. Most of us receive monetary remuneration of our work in the context of time. Our level of education is largely quantified in relation to how much time we spent in study. We typically assess projects and chores on how much time they require. Even the level of intimacy in our relationships is largely based on time spent with each other.

Rarely do we seem to have enough time. We keep track of days, hours, minutes, and even seconds to maximize time. Our attempts at accomplishing, experiencing, and enjoying everything we need or want often results in time being sacrificed from another aspect of our lives. Sleep is one of …
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Risë Rafferty, RDN

Health Educator
Light Bearers

Spinach by Risë Rafferty

Spinach

March 1, 2017 | Risë Rafferty, RDN

Spinach is an extremely nutrient-packed vegetable. Its tender leaves and mild flavor have made it a versatile food. Interestingly, the cooler the temperatures and the more stress the spinach experiences while growing, the denser the vitamins and minerals it contains. Unfortunately, even though spinach is probably one of the most commonly consumed dark green leafy vegetables, the average American (myself included) does not get anywhere near the three cups a day of green leafy vegetables that Dr. Terry Wahls consumed to address her multiple sclerosis. Her testimony is quite provocative, as she shares how, with the aid of dramatic dietary intervention, she went from being wheelchair bound to riding bikes and running. After reaping such results, Dr. Wahls is motivated to eat her greens. What would motivate you to eat more green leafy vegetables?

Cancer fighter

Rather than saying that green vegetables prevent cancer, science likes to identify individual substances that have proven efficacy in the lab. Spinach contains chlorophyll; chlorophyllin, a substance produced from chlorophyll; NOG (N-oxalylglycine); and MGDG, …
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Risë Rafferty, RDN

Health Educator
Light Bearers

The Improbabilities of Probiotics by Risë Rafferty

The Improbabilities of Probiotics

February 1, 2017 | Risë Rafferty, RDN

If we readily saw the microscopic organisms swimming in lake water the way Antonie van Leeuwenhoek did, we would probably never venture in again. If we could see what lives on our teeth as Leeuwenhoek observed, we might not be able to stomach a kiss in the light. Referred to as “the Improbable Father of Microbiology,” Leeuwenhoek was a Dutchman who owned a textile business in the seventeenth century. Though he traded cloth, his were among the first eyes to see bacteria. At the time, traders in textiles used small glass spheres to examine the detail and quality of material. Leeuwenhoek took his small glass spheres to the next level and created extremely high quality magnifying lenses. In 1674 he reported seeing single cell organisms through his lens. The scientists of the day refused to accept his findings until three years later. In 1676 he discovered bacteria. In pond water and in the tartar he scraped from off his own teeth, he observed thousands of “tiny animals” in motion.1

Since …
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Risë Rafferty, RDN

Health Educator
Light Bearers

Precious Seed by Risë Rafferty

Precious Seed

March 3, 2016 | Risë Rafferty, RDN

One of my favorite flowers possesses delicate blue petals that drop off before evening, only to open a new bouquet every morning. The flower is delicate, yet tenacious, resilient, and beautiful. Science has found that of even greater significance in this plant are its seeds, which have powerful therapeutic properties. Studies conducted with animals and humans have revealed the impact these seeds can have on multiple aspects of health, even on cardiovascular disease, the number one cause of death.

The most commonly measured blood markers indicating risk of heart attack and stroke are blood lipids. These include total cholesterol, LDL and HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides, essentially the fatty content of the blood. Blood is drawn and sent to the lab where clinicians assess the levels. Elevated total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides with corresponding low HDL cholesterol is indicative of risk. LDL is the form of cholesterol that is denser and damaging and therefore, referred to as lousy.

A common group of pharmaceuticals that is prescribed when cholesterol levels are …
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Risë Rafferty, RDN

Health Educator
Light Bearers

Insulin Insufficiency in the Brain by Rise Rafferty

Insulin Insufficiency in the Brain

November 4, 2015 | Risë Rafferty, RDN

In Toronto, Canada, 1922, Leonard, a 14-year-old young man, weighing a mere 65 pounds, lay dying of type 1 diabetes in a hospital ward. At that time hospitals had dedicated wards where 50 children could be congregated, suffering the trauma and ultimate death of insulin insufficiency. For hundreds of years, up to that time, the diagnosis of diabetes in a child was a death sentence. A starvation diet was the treatment of the time. Leonard, though, would be the first to receive a new treatment, an injection of insulin. The initial injection was impure and Leonard suffered a severe allergic reaction to it. Days later he was treated again with a purified dose. This time it was a success.

Insulin is a hormone that you literally cannot live without. Just like a car cannot run without gas, the body depends largely upon glucose to produce energy. Insulin is kind of like the hand that opens the tank to allow glucose into the cells from the blood stream. Insulin brings blood …
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Risë Rafferty, RDN

Health Educator
Light Bearers

Splenda

Splenda

August 5, 2015 | Risë Rafferty, RDN

Splenda is the most popular sugar substitute on the market. It is easily identifiable in the large yellow box or little yellow packets filled with sweet white crystals. The key ingredient in Splenda is sucralose, a non-nutritive artificial sweetener. For volume sake it is combined with fillers including dextrose and maltodextrin. Sucralose is approximately 600 times sweeter than table sugar and yet has zero calories. It is estimated that 65-95 percent of ingested sucralose is not absorbed into the blood stream from the gastrointestinal tract, but rather is excreted in the feces. What could be better than a carb-free, non-calorie sweetener? So far Splenda is sounding pretty good.

In a society whose consumption of sweets and sugar sweetened beverages has been increasingly associated with the major health problems of our day including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome, replacing a 150 calorie soda with a 1 calorie diet soda seems like a good idea. However, does the reduction in calorie consumption from drinking diet drinks translate into lower body …
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Risë Rafferty, RDN

Health Educator
Light Bearers