Posts Tagged: microbes

Interconnected by Risë Rafferty

Interconnected

June 28, 2017 | Risë Rafferty, RDN

Suffering from pain, debility, loss of quality of life, destruction and/or malfunction of bodily processes and tissue characterizes disease. Medical science has devoted itself to the study of disease and in so doing has specialized in categorizing the human body so that we can see the correct specialist for the defined problem. It seems neat and tidy that way, at least in our current medical system. Unfortunately, there is not a facet of our physiology that has escaped illness.

We tend to think that if we have pain in the knee we have a joint problem. If we have pain or malfunction of the intestines we must have a gastrointestinal problem. If my heart beats irregularly, I must have a heart problem. If we have elevated blood sugar levels we must be eating too many carbs, etc. In reality, it can be a lot more complex than that. The more I study, the more amazed I am that when God designed the human body, He was less concerned about compartmentalizing …
read more »

Risë Rafferty, RDN

Health Educator
Light Bearers

Butyrate and the Bowel, Part 3 by Rise Rafferty

Butyrate and the Bowel, pt 3

October 5, 2016 | Risë Rafferty, RDN

Crosstalk is a term that can pertain to telecommunications, when distinguishable signals leak from one connection to another. In electronics, crosstalk is a phenomenon by which a signal on one circuit or channel of a transmission system creates an effect on another circuit or channel. The term has been borrowed and used in reference to the human body when communication signals in one body system “leak out” and communicate to another seemingly unrelated body system. For example, science is suggesting that crosstalk exists between the bowel and the brain via butyrate.

We have been looking at the short-chain fatty acid butyrate the past couple months and have seen what a significant role it plays in bowel health, immune system function, obesity, and diabetes. “Indeed, it is clear that host energy metabolism and immune functions critically depend on butyrate as a potent regulator, highlighting butyrate as a key mediator of host-microbe crosstalk.”1 But even beyond this crosstalk between host and microbe, the suggestion that butyrate crosstalks with the brain has led …
read more »

Risë Rafferty, RDN

Health Educator
Light Bearers

Butyrate and the Bowel, pt 2 by Risë Rafferty

Butyrate and the Bowel, pt 2

August 31, 2016 | Risë Rafferty, RDN

Last month we began understanding one of the ways the community of microbes residing within impacts the health of its host organ, the colon, as well as other facets of human health. This community is composed of many members in various concentrations or percentages. There are thousands of varieties/species, some of which science is still discovering. They could be likened to family clans; the McCalahans, the De Lucas, the Gonzalezs, the Takahashis, different and unique from each other, yet dwelling in one community. The strains of microbes that flourish in this community are in part determined by what they are fed.

We learned that certain strains of bacteria ferment carbohydrates that have been thus far indigestible in the digestive system. As the bacteria break these indigestible carbohydrates down, they produce short-chain fatty acids that are secreted into the colon, byproducts of the fermentation process. Butyrate is one of these short-chain fatty acid byproducts. We observed that butyrate has made headlines in medical journals as a result of the intriguing results …
read more »

Risë Rafferty, RDN

Health Educator
Light Bearers

Vanishing Perplexities

Vanishing Perplexities

July 3, 2015 | Risë Rafferty, RDN

In the hospital it is not uncommon to see doctor’s orders for C. diff testing in patient charts. C. diff is an abbreviation for Clostridium difficile. If C. diff + is charted it means the patient has Clostridium difficile infection (CDI).  C. diff is a bacterium that can cause symptoms ranging from diarrhea to life-threatening inflammation of the colon. It is more commonly seen after antibiotic use and in the elderly. In your intestines, C. diff produces a toxin that causes diarrhea and colitis. “Each year, more than a half million people get sick from C. difficile, and in recent years, C. difficile infections have become more frequent, severe and difficult to treat.”1 It is difficult to treat as it is spore forming and has a protective shell. In addition to this, C. diff has been labeled the most urgent of all superbug infections due to its developed resistance to antibiotic therapy. Most of us have C. diff in our colon in a healthy balance with other bacteria. It can …
read more »

Risë Rafferty, RDN

Health Educator
Light Bearers